To embrace uncertainty means to accept that there is uncertainty. To understand that you will never know for sure what is going to happen next and in fact that you do not need to in order to be successful and profitable. Many people are addressing uncertainty and randomness in their betting by moving towards sports trading approaches, backing and laying, trading in and out, taking profits at pre-chosen prices and not just waiting for the final outcome.
He is the author of ?Sports Betting To Win? and ?High Performance Trading ? 35 Practical Strategies and Techniques to Enhance Your Trading Psychology and Performance? (published by Harriman House), helped to set up and establish the Centaur Sports Trading Academy, managed a team of over 40 professional financial traders in London and was a consultant to the BBC TV programme Million Dollar Traders.
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Chariot racing was one of the most popular ancient Greek, Roman and Byzantine sports. Both chariot and mounted horse racing were events in the ancient Greek Olympics by 648 BC[5] and were important in the other Panhellenic Games. It continued although chariot racing was often dangerous to both driver and horse, which frequently suffered serious injury and even death. In the Roman Empire, chariot and mounted horse racing were major industries.[6] From the mid-fifteenth century until 1882, spring carnival in Rome closed with a horse race. Fifteen to 20 riderless horses, originally imported from the Barbary Coast of North Africa, were set loose to run the length of the Via del Corso, a long, straight city street; their time was about 2½ minutes.
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