By giving all of your focus to a single sport and doing your due diligence, you can find great value on lines on a regular basis. Remember that public perception factors into the making of point spreads and moneylines as well; if you are way ahead of the public in terms of knowledge on a specific sport, you can spot lines that the average bettor might not.
On the flip side, I bet sports as basically a second income. I am very thankful to have a job in engineering that affords me the opportunity to bet enough to accomplish this and leaves me a safety net to lose what I put in and be okay. Just an example is for college football season this year (2018), I put in $10,000 for the regular season. I can do what I want within the season with that but will not buy back in. I also will never exceed $10,000 in bets at one time. My account will always be viewed as having $10,000 during this season because I never want to bet more because I have won and have profits. That is a common problem for gamblers and it really is difficult to avoid the thought of well I can make so much more if I bet this much more. It is 100% true that money management is the most important aspect of sports betting. If you can’t do this well, you may get into serious financial trouble at worst, and less important but still relevant, you will not be able to beat the sports books constantly or over time without understanding which bets make sense by realizing how much to bet, which lines to bet and which matchups offer the highest win and payout percentages. Most hobby betters bet based on how much they can win in a bet, a handicapper or shark bets where they are getting the best odds for their money. Maybe they don’t even believe in the team to win, but if the value makes sense, they will wager on it because it makes sense financially. So an example is you have $2000 and want to bet on at most two games. The average person would tend to bet on as many outcomes as possible but in this case would take two teams and we will say standard line of -110. What has happened is that you have really damaged your chance of making a profit on this bet. This is due to beginning each matchup with a basic, implied odds of 52.38% which means you have this % chance to win one game. This comes from the line of -110 (if it was -100 or even odds, you would have a 50% chance to win) which converts to 1.91 decimal odds. You divide 1 (one bet) by the decimal % (1/1.91) and get 52.38%. So on two games, at -110, you will have 13/5 fractional odds (just an example here) to win or 2.6 decimal odds so you should divide 1 by 2.6 which gives you 38.46% implied odds to win both bets. What would the bets pay out? Win one at $1000 with -110 (1.91 decimal odds so 1.91*1000=payout) and you get $909.09 profit from the win and a total back of $1909.09 with your bet amount returned. So maybe you can see why 2 bets wouldn’t be a great investment. If not, here’s why. Say you win just 1 of the two matchups, you get the payout of $1909.09 so you have lost money on your bets for the day. And with only a 38% chance to win (usually will be a little less maybe a little more depending on the odds and line) both bets and taking $1818.18 in profits, you are not going to beat those percentages over time which is the only thing that matters to a professional bettor. Putting all of your money on one outcome offers the best chance to win and the same payout amount so obviously you are getting a better return on your money and will have a better chance to walk away with a profit at season’s end. So this is a very simplistic example and doesn’t take into account lines or the options of taking the points for an underdog with a decent positive moneyline. Just a rule to state here: never bet more than you can afford to lose or care about losing.
The discussion has been going on all season, but with the release of the first College Football Playoff Rankings, we can see who has the inside track on the postseason and who’s leading the way in the bowl projections for 2017. Alabama, Clemson, Michigan, and Texas A&M fans can breathe easy for now according to college football predictions, but we ... Read More »

Professional sports bettors have to worry about variance more than any other type of gambler. Working against the forces of variance means managing your bankroll over the course of the season to avoid the negative possibilities that could totally empty your wagering account. Professional sports bettors have the time and resources necessary to calculate these variances, and there are even a few pieces of software out there that can help you figure out your ideal bet in the face of negative variance. But the bottom line is that professional sports bettors would dream of having a 55% winning record, simply because it guarantees you’re beating the house.


When there IS some value in their odds and lines, there are so many other people betting on these sports that it soon disappears. A good price will see lots of money coming in very quickly, and when that happens the bookmakers adjust their odds and lines accordingly. So unless we’re also very quick, we can easily miss out on the best opportunities.
In considering golf wagering for the future and the potential impact of ‘integrity fees’, how will the PGA handle these types of situations with a royalty being collected by the PGA for all the golf wagering during their tournaments? The PGA issued a statement on regulation saying that it’s the most effective way of “ensuring integrity in competition, protecting consumers, engaging fans and generating revenue for government, operators and leagues.”
While meets like Saratoga and Del Mar get all the glory in the summer and other meets, such as the Fair Grounds and Gulfstream, may get the best horses in the winter, the blue collar horses of the industry go out every couple of weeks and race. Tracks like Parx, Penn National and Charles Town race almost the entire year. Other tracks, like Mountaineer, run nine months out of the year and can be treated similarly.
So what is the best theory on money management? There are several methods that have proven successful by many professional gamblers. In speaking to most of these individuals, discipline being the main ingredient. I personally believe that one should never bet more than 20 percent of their season bankroll on any given week. An example would be if a gambler starts with a seasonal bankroll of $5,000.  Thus, they will have $1000 (20 percent of your bankroll) to bet with on opening week. If we were to release eight football picks on the first week it would look like this:
Money Management is as critical to a sports investor as picking winners. I have devoted many hours of careful analysis and math to optimal money management systems, which I have painstakingly outlined in my Money Management articles. Sports betting is more high risk (higher volatility and standard deviation of return) than stocks, but also results in a higher return if you follow a proven long term winning handicapper (of which there are very few).

If you've ever said the phrase "I'm not a numbers guy but....", then you probably shouldn't be a betting guy either. While plenty of gamblers can make a success of it by betting on instinct and 'feel', to be successful long term you need a viable staking plan and you need to understand what the odds reflect in terms of probability. In short, its a numbers game, and you need an adequate relationship with division and multiplication as a minimum.
Independent of which kind of long-term bet you choose, you should always do one thing before placing the betting team: Gather as much information as possible. Before teh start of a competition, you should know which transfers were made or whether there have been other changes in personnel. Additionally it's important to know about the form of the teams or individual players of the last season or the last weeks and months. Are there injuries or other impairments? Only when the most important facts are known, you should place your tip. You should always be aware: Individual sports are riskier with long-term bets, becasue everything stands and falls with one person. If the respective athlete, that you bet on, gets injured during the season for example or needs to take a break for other reasons, your bet will be soon lost. In team sports individual injuries can be better compensated. On the other hand it's easier in individual sports to judge the form and make a forecast.

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**This is pretty long and covers your question and betting sports as a full-time endeavor. I bet year-round but don’t know if I would term myself a professional sports bettor and don’t have the bankroll to ever be a “shark” but I know the industry and the sports inside and out and put in considerable amounts towards each season. If you want to see what work goes into this and not just a numbers explanation (means nothing to someone who isn’t betting full-time and isn’t useful for someone who is because they already know) read it and let me know if you have any questions.**
It‘s amazing that many of us run or work within successful businesses backed by good ethics and a sound money management theory, but refuse to use these same techniques when it comes to sports betting money management. Would you bet 25 percent of your retirement fund on a single stock that had a 40 percent chance of going in the tank tomorrow? Would you invest in a real estate development under the same scenario? Nobody would do either of these propositions, yet many people are willing to bet 20 to 30 percent of their betting resources a single game. The books know that most of us lack discipline and that greed, sooner or later, will get the best of the gambler and that some early returns for the bettor will likely eventually swing to big profits for the bookmaker.
The 2nd concern is 57% winning rate. Is it something everybody can achieve? The video assumes we get 100% winning amount of our original bet amount when we win (namely 2.0 decimal odds). However, that’s the return we can expect under the magic break-even rate of 52.4%, therefore we have to achieve nearly 9% better (57% / 52.4) winning rate than the probability of outcome the actual odds at bookmaker suggests.
Last 4 Premier League games have seen each team get a couple of wins with Chelsea Scoring 4 and City scoring 3 goals. It remains to be seen how both the tactically sound managers will set up their teams but expect Manchester City players and Manager to show that championship mentality and come up with a big, but close, result to sneak themselves to the top position on the table for one more week and push Chelsea out of the top-4.
Bookies don’t offer even money like friends in a casual betting situation. In the above example, with two evenly matched boxers, a smart bookie will offer 5/6 odds for each. That way, a $10 winning bet would only return $8.30 plus your stake. What does this do for the bookmaker? He can float an equal amount of money on both fighters, winning no matter which fighter actually wins. If they take $1,000 worth of bets on one boxer and $1,000 on the other, the bookie would take in $1,000 but only have to pay out $830, for a guaranteed $170 profit regardless of the outcome.
The NHL’s Stanley Cup Playoffs start a few days after April 7, which is when the regular season ends. Of the 31 teams, 16 make it into the postseason. Each series is best of seven. The playoffs will often go into May. The NBA season ends April 11 and the playoffs begin April 14 and end at some point in early June. A total of 16 teams make it into the NBA postseason.
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