The positions of the four major American sports leagues (representing American football, baseball, basketball, and ice hockey) have become more complex since their decision to embrace daily fantasy sports (DFS) in 2014, which are described by those within the industry as "almost identical to a casino" in nature. With the contention by critics that such activities blur the lines between gambling and fantasy sports, the endorsement of all four major sports leagues and many individual franchises provided a marked contrast to their positions on betting.[43]

A very big step to becoming a winning sports bettor is to make sure you are shopping for the best lines. What this means is that you will have to have an account at a couple of different online sportsbooks and when you are ready to make a bet on a certain team or outcome you check the different sportsbooks and find which book is offering the best line for you (this ties in with our advanced how to find max value article). For example, if you are looking to bet on the New England Patriots on a 7 point spread, you would want to check a couple different sportsbooks to see if any of them are offering the Patriots at 6.5 points, or at the very least find the best price you can get them at 7 points at. Over the course of a sport betting season you can win yourself a lot of money from shopping the lines that would otherwise would not be one. Line shopping is definitely one of the best sports betting strategies used by winning sports bettors. To see a list of sportsbooks we recommend signing up for visit our Online Betting Sites section.
A successful sports betting strategy begins with managing your bankroll. To make a living betting sports, you must treat it as you would any other business. The old saying is that you should not use your rent money to bet with. That is true. But if you're betting for a living it is equally true that you must not use your gambling bankroll to pay the rent.
Here's a crude MS Paint Line Graph (below) to explain kind of what I'm talking about. The difference in odds between favorite and underdog will always be there. Nearly all of the time, other books will have similar, if not, identical odds. When you allow the lines to move and shift, once the underdog line (or vice versa) passes the initial plane of the favorite line, you'll be guaranteed a profit.
This is just some broad advice, and you don’t need to follow it to the letter. Remember, we can’t actually tell you explicitly what to do here. There’s no right or wrong decision, as you’ve just got to consider what’s best for you. The information and advice we’ve offered will hopefully help. If you’re still not sure what to do, then just take some time to experiment with the different approaches. Eventually, you’ll find one that works for you.
For most mainstream sports, there’s a wealth of information readily available. Some sports have TV channels dedicated entirely to broadcasting all the latest news, and most newspapers cover the popular sports extensively too. And then there’s the internet. The internet is full of useful sports resources where we can find out pretty much anything we could possibly want to know about any of the major sports.
The Sports Geek was founded in 2008 and has continued to grow since. It started off as a small site and there were no real big plans for it, but as the passion for sports betting grew the website also grew with it. It’s had a team of writers helping give out free picks daily since 2010 and we’ve had a lot of success with our picks. Because of the abundance of free sports betting information we offer, our following has continued to grow.
On our Picks page, you’ll notice dollar signs, ATS, To Win and Total O/U. These are all betting terms that you should familiarize yourself with in order to make strategic picks. Under the Last 100 heading, you’ll see the records for the last 100 games played in the Premier League. The table also features the amount of money won (or lost) based on the opening and closing lines, ATS and Total O/U. It may seem like gibberish but don’t worry, we’ll explain each term below.  
×