Bookies don’t offer even money like friends in a casual betting situation. In the above example, with two evenly matched boxers, a smart bookie will offer 5/6 odds for each. That way, a $10 winning bet would only return $8.30 plus your stake. What does this do for the bookmaker? He can float an equal amount of money on both fighters, winning no matter which fighter actually wins. If they take $1,000 worth of bets on one boxer and $1,000 on the other, the bookie would take in $1,000 but only have to pay out $830, for a guaranteed $170 profit regardless of the outcome.
Odds for different outcomes in single bet are presented either in European format (decimal odds), UK format (fractional odds), or American format (moneyline odds). European format (decimal odds) are used in continental Europe, Canada, and Australia. They are the ratio of the full payout to the stake, in a decimal format. Decimal odds of 2.00 are an even bet. UK format (fractional odds) are used by British bookmakers. They are the ratio of the amount won to the stake - the solidus "/" is pronounced "to" for example 7/1 "seven to one". Fractional odds of 1/1 are an even bet. US format odds are the amount won on a 100 stake when positive and the stake needed to win 100 when negative. US odds of 100 are an even bet.
Sportsbooks are huge for Vegas casinos, bringing in $136.3 Million in 2009. The only games which brought in more money were 3 card poker, roulette, craps, baccarat, blackjack, and slot machines. It seems as bettors do well with sports betting as the casino only has a 5.31% win percentage, compared to 11.31% for blackjack, and 12.04% for all table games.
We’ve all been there. After a string of rough losses or a losing streak, there is a temptation for bettors to forgo their process and chase their losses. This, of course, only makes matters worse. Chasing your losses will put a serious dent in your long-term profits and may ultimately derail your sports betting career, especially if you wager more than your normal amount when you suffer a losing streak, in hopes of making back your money.

This leaves smart gamblers to find great value opportunities where the general public's opinion is just plain wrong. It also means that great value can be found on events where there is expected to be greater interest than normal by the occasional and casual gambler, who lets be honest, knows nothing or very little in terms of profitable betting strategy. Events like the AFL and NRL Grand Finals and major horse racing events are prime candidates for this sort of opportunity.
Unfortunately, there is no simple right or wrong answer to that complicated question. But, any professional handicapper that claims to have never seen a loss is full of it. However, there are reputable picks services out there that provide analysis on top of their predictions. Buying picks is different for every bettor and their own personal situation. Below we’ll explore why that is and if paying for picks is worth it.

Straight-up bets, also known as the moneyline, are picks that are made on one club triumphing over the other. If Manchester City is playing Watford, in order to make a moneyline wager you’d need to pick one of those clubs to win. If you choose Man City and they do win, you’d win your moneyline bet. If the inverse happens and Watford wins, you’d lose your moneyline bet.
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