Each better must know his limits and choose the sport, competition and region accordingly. Information is vital – the more you know about the sport, the better for you. The information sources are the Internet, watching TV, participation on the matches etc. Betting according to the actual ranking such as "the third team plays the one but last team" is certainly insufficient.
I don’t believe that the term ‘gambling’ applies to what I do. I sell information to subscribers, with which they can take positive expectation positions in uncertain markets. With correct financial optimization and bankroll management, long term risks are nominal compared to the risks of investing in other, more conventional markets. Just as a single stock may go up or down in a day, any one team may win or lose a given game. But as long as the investor maintains a long-term perspective, understands variance, and doesn’t over-extend themselves or bet more than they can easily handle, risk can be highly mitigated, and they can earn a very attractive risk adjusted return.

Sports betting has resulted in a number of scandals in sport, affecting the integrity of sports events through various acts including point shaving (players affecting the score by missing shots), spot-fixing (a player action is fixed), bad calls from officials at key moments, and overall match fixing (the overall result of the event is fixed). Examples include the 1919 World Series, the alleged (and later admitted) illegal gambling of former MLB player Pete Rose, and former NBA referee Tim Donaghy.
This depends upon the popularity of the event, but in general, bookmaker odds will be more a reflection of what they expect the general public to play, rather than on the actual probabilities of either outcome. Of course, it's not quite that simple, but in general, bookmakers will set their odds so as to attract betting on either side of the odds, so as to balance their liability and take their commission.
We are constantly reviewing the picks the team is putting out on a nightly basis to ensure we have only the highest quality information and picks being posted at The Sports Geek. We have certain team members dedicated to each league so that they can keep their focus focus on their handicapping specialties. This allows each writer to specialize in their sports and give out picks with a very solid winning percentage.
The Key: The Utah Jazz will be hungry for a victory tonight over the Oklahoma City Thunder.  They have lost all 3 meetings with the Thunder this season, including the last two in excruciating fashion by a single point each.  They’ll avoid the season sweep and get a win and cover at home tonight.  The Thunder have been vulnerable of late, going 3-7 SU & 1-9 ATS in their last 10 games overall.  They just aren’t playing much defense at all, allowing 108-plus points in 11 of their last 12 games overall.  The Jazz are 18-7-1 ATS in their last 26 games off a loss.  Take Utah.
Other popular sports for betting that are NOT on this list include baseball, darts, rugby and horse racing. We didn’t include baseball because that doesn’t get a lot of betting attention outside of the United States. Darts doesn’t get much attention outside of the United Kingdom, and rugby is only popular in a few countries. Horse racing DOES get worldwide attention, but horse racing betting is typically categorized as its own unique form of gambling.
Like every successful bettor, we’re looking for inefficiencies in betting markets which pop up regularly with the sheer volume of games being played day in day out. Niels, our model maker, first identifies value bets through his xG (expected goals model) then we move on to an in-depth look at some situational statistics plus team news. Once we feel confident that the odds are stacked in our favor, we pull the trigger
The easiest way to demonstrate the math behind a sports bet is to make up an example. Let’s say you and your buddy walk into a casino, each with $200 burning a hole in your pocket. There’s a big game on tonight, the Cowboys and the Redskins, so you wander into the sportsbook to check up on the latest news about the game. While you’re sitting there, you see the wagering board, with some funny numbers on it. It looks like this:
It's a widely known concept that the vast majority of sports bettors are going to lose money. The most popular concept is that 90-percent of sports gamblers will lose money over the course of the year, but that doesn't stop people from wagering on sports. When those bettors eventually go broke and cannot wager anymore, there's always somebody else waiting to take their place in line.
Even though most sports bettors are losers in their own right (as a whole, bettors actually win an average of only 48% of their bets – less than they would expect to win if they just flipped a coin for every game), their losses are compounded by the fact that the house takes a cut of winnings, also known as the ‘juice’ or ‘vig.’ Most sports books charge a 10% commission on wins, which means that a bettor must actually win 52.4% of his games just to break even. (Wagering $100 per game, a bettor loses $100 with a loss and wins $90.91 with a win, so he must go 11-10 (11/21 = 52.38%) to break even).
ATS equals “against the spread”. The spread is the number oddsmakers use to give people other betting options besides only wins and losses. A spread for a Premier League fixture would be something like .5 or 1.5. One club would need to lose the match by no more than 1 or 2 goals or the other needs to win by 1, 2or more goals.  If the final score doesn’t reflect the number set by the oddsmakers, your bet won’t cover the spread and you can’t win your bet.
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